MICHAEL J LAGERMAN

ANOKA FARUQEE AND DAVID DRISCOLL AT THE SUBURBAN

STUNNED BY THESE PAINTINGS SPINNING HYPNOTISMS I FELT THEM AROUND ME. THE INTIMATE, YET UNIQUELY CLINICALSUBURBAN SPACE WAS BLASTING WITH SOUNDS OF COLORS. THE EDGES OF THE CANVAS REVEAL LAYERS OF HARDENED PLASTIC, STILL APPEARING SOMEWHAT SOFT AS IF THEY HAD BEEN RUBBERIZED FOR A CONSUMER’S TACTILE ENJOYMENT. THE PAINTINGS HAVE A CONSUMER QUALITY TO THEM, THEIR CONCENTRICITY AND HIGHLIGHTER COLORS FEEL FAMILIAR. THEY SHINE LIKE THE IRIDESCENT GLOSS OF A CD, BUT THEY ALSO RESEMBLE THE IMPRESSION OF A VINYL RECORD. DOES THIS MAKE THEM NOSTALGIC? DO THE PAINTING’S MACHINED, FLAT FRONT RESIST THIS IMPRESSION OF NOSTALGIA? I REST WITH BEING UNCERTAIN ON THESE QUESTIONS. AS FOR THE QUESTION OF WHY THE CONTINUITY OF MUSIC - I ANSWERSIMPLY BECAUSE I LIKE ART THAT SINGS AND THESE PAINTINGS OFFER HARMONIOUS TUNES.


paintings by Anoka Faruqee and David Driscoll at the Suburban in Walker’s Point, Milwaukee, WI, 2019.

biography courtesy: Koenig & Clinton